Colonial Williamsburg - March 3, 2017

(most historic sites open 9am-5pm, but shops/restaurant hours vary)

First stop is the Group Arrivals Building where you will let them know you're here for Homeschool Days and purchase your tickets.  The Visitor's Center opens at 9:15am.  Parking is free, and your admission ticket includes unlimited rides on the shuttle to and from the historic district.  You can also park closer to the building in parking garages that have their own fees.

Tickets:
Adults $10
Kids (6-17) $8
Kids (0-5) Free

Where:
Colonial Williamsburg Group Arrivals Building
(behind the main Visitor Center)
107 Visitor Center Dr
Williamsburg, VA 23185


What does an admission ticket get you?
Access to all the historic sites, homes and trade shops (with working 18th century tradespeople explaining their crafts), two art museums, tours of the Governor's Palace, the Capitol Building, and all government buildings, 10% discount on some tours and evening programs, seasonal discount on carriage rides and complementary shuttle service for the day.  

What to do while you're there: 
There are lots of free attractions, so tickets are not needed for everything.  There are also things that have additional charges (some tours and classes, food and shopping, and wagon or carriage rides all cost money even if you have a ticket).  Here's what I found on the website this week that should be available on Friday.

Free Activities/Sites:
  • Walk the streets and see historical sites, buildings, and gardens from the street.
  • Visit taverns and retail shops
  • Play on the grounds of the Governor's Palace and several other outdoor areas where kids can play and interpreters will tell you about their lives. 
Scheduled Activities on the Colonial Williamsburg Calendar for March 3, 2017:
    (These events will either require an admission ticket or an additional fee)
    • To Fire a Flintlock Musket, 9:30, 11, 1:30 & 3, Location on ticket 
    • Donor Visit with James Madison, 10, Tucker House 
    • Ox Wagon Rides, 10, 10:30, 11, 11:30, 12 & 12:30, Palace Green 
    • Love Unites Us, 10:15, Art Museums 
    • Decorative Arts Highlights, 11 & 1, Art Museums 
    • Order in the Court, 11 Courthouse 
    • Introduction to Folk Art, 12 & 2 Art Museums 
    • Ceramics UpClose, 1:30 to 3:45 Art Museums 
    • A Gathering of Hair, 2 Governor's Palace East Advance 
    • Hidden Figures, 2, 4:45, 7:30, Kimball Theatre 
    • Behind the Scenes at Bruton Heights 2:30, See free ticket for location


The rest of this page is copied directly from the Colonial Wiliamsburg website and lists historic sites that require an admission ticket to enter: 
https://www.colonialwilliamsburg.com/historic-area

HISTORIC AREA
Become part of our community

For most of the 18th century, Williamsburg served as the capital of Virginia, the largest and most prosperous American colony. It was the center of business, diplomacy, and independence. The men and women who lived, worked, and traveled through this bustling center of activity came from all walks of life, but sought to better their circumstances in large or small ways. Independence was declared before all other colonies at the Capitol. Native American diplomats met with government officials to secure peace and negotiate trade. More than half of the population was enslaved. Farmers and merchants sold their wares in the Market House. Though the capital was moved from Williamsburg to Richmond, the city is very much alive today. It's time to go back. 

Meet fascinating 18th-century people from a variety of backgrounds and learn how their choices impacted their families and their community. Take a moment to engage with men and women who sought to better their lives each and every day as best they could, despite their circumstances. Chat with tradespeople as they use 18th-century tools and techniques to create unique pieces for use or sale across the city. Most of the trades have been around since the beginning of our civilization, and the rich history holds true today. These skilled men and women are true apprentices, journeymen, and masters in their crafts and use real 18th-century methods. They hone their skills with every hammer, needle, or plow.Stay informed on their projects by keeping up with their FACEBOOK page, and don't be shy when it comes to asking questions about the trades.

Learn from modern interpreters as they link the past and present and reveal the ideas that shaped our nation. Take a moment to visit a historical site like the Governor's Palace or the Capitol and learn about the historical moments that happened inside the walls. Many of the buildings in the Historic Area are original 18th-century buildings, while others are reconstructed to their 18th-century aesthetic. When you visit these sites, you're standing on the exact same ground as influential Nation Builders such as Thomas Jefferson, Martha Washington, and James Madison. History surrounds you here. With your COLONIAL WILLIAMSBURG ADMISSION TICKET, much of the city is open to you, with plenty to see, do, and learn—no matter what your interests may be. Browse our locations below for more information on each of the sites.

                                                      

ANDERSON BLACKSMITH SHOP AND PUBLIC ARMOURY

The Revolutionary War wasn't won through battles alone. To keep pace with the might of British industry, ...

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Admission Ticket Required

  • ACCESSIBLE

APOTHECARY

What was it like to be sick or injured in colonial times? What could you expect when you went to visit the ...

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Admission Ticket Required

    BINDERY

    Today we might take books for granted, but in colonial America only the rich could afford a large library. ...

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    Admission Ticket Required

      BRICKMAKER

      During the summer, brickmakers mold and dry thousands of bricks. You can even give them a hand by taking off ...

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      Admission Ticket Required

      • ACCESSIBLE

      CABINETMAKER

      Apprentice cabinetmakers studied many years under their masters to learn how to make furniture. Discover how ...

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      Admission Ticket Required

        CARPENTER'S YARD

        Almost every colonial building used wood, so carpentry was one of the most common of trades in Williamsburg. ...

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        Admission Ticket Required

        • ACCESSIBLE

        COOPER

        Barrels were the shipping containers of the 18th century. They could be made "slack" or watertight, suited to ...

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        Admission Ticket Required

        • ACCESSIBLE

        FOODWAYS

        What did Williamsburg's 18th-century residents eat - and how did they cook it? Take a look into any of our ...

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        Admission Ticket Required

        • ACCESSIBLE

        FOUNDRY

        The Geddys were a talented family. They included gunsmiths, cutlers, founders, and silversmiths among their ...

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        Admission Ticket Required

          GUNSMITH

          The work of a colonial gunsmith united many skills, from forging iron to working wood. A careful eye and ...

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          Admission Ticket Required

            JOINERY

            Joiners were woodworkers who produced the finish work for buildings: doors, windows, shutters, fireplace ...

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            Admission Ticket Required

            • ACCESSIBLE

            MILLINER

            Be an 18th-century customer. Share your fashion needs as boxes, drawers, and bundles full of the latest ...

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            Admission Ticket Required

              PRINTING OFFICE

              In an age before TV, radio, and the internet, the printed word was the primary means of long-distance mass ...

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              Admission Ticket Required

              • ACCESSIBLE

              SHOEMAKER

              How were men's shoes made 250 years ago, before modern factories and assembly lines? Come meet some the last ...

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              Admission Ticket Required

                SILVERSMITH

                Silver cups, teapots, and spoons were not just for show. They were a good way to "store" your assets. Skilled ...

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                Admission Ticket Required

                  TAILOR

                  Touch and feel the many different sorts of fabrics and garments that clothed colonial Americans, from elegant ...

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                  Admission Ticket Required

                    TIN SHOP

                    Soldiers valued tinware for its durability, low cost, and light weight. To supply the army during the ...

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                    Admission Ticket Required

                    • ACCESSIBLE

                    WEAVER

                    When English imports were cut off by the Revolution, local weavers came forward to fill the need for everyday ...

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                    Admission Ticket Required

                      WHEELWRIGHT

                      Wheels kept things rolling in the 18th century - from carriages of the wealthy to farm wagons, ox carts, and ...

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                      Admission Ticket Required

                        WIGMAKER

                        Fashion was just as important in the 18th century as today - maybe even more so if you wanted to be part of ...

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                        Admission Ticket Required

                          • 101 Visitor Center Drive
                          • Williamsburg, VA 23185
                          • (888) 965-7254

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